Skip to main content

Roundtables involve experts and other individuals with helpful knowledge who can provide insights on relevant issues through public, facilitated discussions.

What is a Roundtable?

The Commission roundtables will be an opportunity to learn more about issues related to why and how various aspects of the mass casualty happened. The expectation is that these are non-adversarial opportunities to hear directly from people with knowledge and experience to share. These activities will be led by members of the Commission’s Research and Policy team and others, while counsel will continue to focus on other aspects of the proceedings. 

The roundtables are held in public and available to watch via webcast or listen by phone. Visit the calendar for a schedule of when roundtables are taking place.

Existing Research and Academic Articles

The Commission has collected existing research and academic articles relevant to the topics of each roundtable. The research is shared with Participants and the roundtable members in advance of the roundtable taking place in the public proceedings. These academic materials support the Commission’s understanding of related issues that are outlined in the mandate and supplement the roundtable discussion. For copyright reasons, the Commission cannot post articles directly to our website. We have provided links to online copies where these are available. Accessing these online articles may require a subscription.  

For documents related to the roundtables, visit the Research and Commissioned Reports page.

  • Police Paraphernalia and Police Impersonators
    April 27, 2022

    This roundtable establishes a basis for a conversation in phase 3 about how best to regulate access to police uniforms and equipment in order to balance competing values and interests. The following core themes are addressed:

    • The cultural significance of police uniforms and equipment and the role that symbols of policing play in public and community relationships with police, including collectors of police paraphernalia
    • The cultural significance of police uniforms and equipment for police (including retired police), and the personal possession of police equipment by police (including retired police)
    • The problem of police imposters – the scale of this problem in Canada, and the impacts of this problem on public trust in police
    Members include:
    • Phil Bailey: Retired member of the Edmonton Police Service who commenced his 40-year policing career at the Atlantic Police Academy and New Glasgow Police Service. Mr. Bailey collects police paraphernalia, particularly badges and crests focused on Atlantic Canada, and maintains a website about this hobby.
    • Brian Carter: Representative of RCMP Veterans Nova Scotia, which has phase 2 Participant status with the Mass Casualty Commission.
    • Julia Cecchetto: Former Chief of Kentville Municipal Police Service and the former Chair of Nova Scotia Chiefs of Police.
    • Meaghan Daniel: Lawyer and “occasional academic”, focusing on social justice legal practice, various forms of state violence, civil rights and civil disobedience, and Indigenous legal traditions.
    • Ian Loader: Member of the Commission’s Research Advisory Board and Professor of Criminology at the University of Oxford. Among other topics, his published research explores the cultural significance of police iconography and the ways in which police services use symbols and material objects of policing to actively cultivate positive affective relationships with the communities they serve.

    Visit the documents section to review related research and policies.

    Watch the Webcast

    Apr. 27, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Roundtable: Police Paraphernalia and Police Impersonators

  • Public communications during emergency events, including emergency alerting
    May 12, 2022

    The roundtables will establish the basis for a conversation in phase 3 about potential recommendations with respect to the design, implementation and proper use of public warning systems including considerations for accessibility and equality.

    Roundtable 1: Systems design and implementation

    The following core themes are addressed:

    • System design principles including stakeholder engagement for public alerting systems such as Alert Ready.
    • Governance and operation of public alert systems including questions of access to that system and appropriate use of the system
    • The role of training and public education in designing and implementing effective public warning systems
    Members include:
    • Michael Hallowes: Independent strategic advisor to governments on the design, delivery, implementation and continuous improvements to public alerting systems. This draws on his experiences from 30 years policing London, UK, followed by working as the Emergency Services Commissioner for the state of Victoria in Australia and National Director of Australia’s Emergency Alert Program.
    • Jennifer Jesty: The First Indigenous Women to become a Member of the Nova Scotia Firefighters Association and the only Indigenous Female Advanced Care Paramedic in Nova Scotia. Currently Jennifer is the Manager of Emergency Planning with the Union of Nova Scotia Mi'kmaq, a tribal council that assists with the needs of all five First Nations Communities in Cape Breton. Jennifer developed the Unama'ki Emergency Alert System.
    • Paul Mason: Executive Director of Nova Scotia’s Provincial Emergency Management Office and Office of the Fire Marshall. Mr. Mason has served as the provincial representative on the Public Alerting Governance Council.
    • Cheryl McNeil: A 35+ year civilian member of the Toronto Police Service. Serving twenty years as a communications operator laid the foundation for her later efforts supporting senior police leaders and partners throughout Toronto, Ontario and Canada with communications interoperability and emergency management concerns of first responders.
    • Tim Trytten: Public Emergency Warning Consultant, former leader of the Alberta Emergency Alert (AEA) Program and dedicated leader in the public alerting sphere. In his role as leader of the AEA, he was responsible for all aspects of the longest-running provincial emergency alerting system. AEA encompasses all of Alberta and uses television, radio, a smartphone app, Facebook, Twitter and other innovative alert distribution methods to provide emergency information to the public.
    Roundtable 2: Planning for accessibility and equality

    The following core themes are addressed:

    • Planning and implementation factors in respect to differences in access to cell phones and wireless coverage in remote regions and across Canadian populations;
    • Warnings communicated in both official languages and in other languages appropriate to the intended audience, and culturally appropriate warnings for intended audiences;
    • The use of public warning systems and patterns of stigmatization and marginalization, for example with respect to racialized communities.
    Members include:
    • Archy Beals: Community advocate who was born and raised in the community of North Preston, Nova Scotia. He has a bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Dalhousie University, a diploma in Education from the Nova Scotia Community College, and a Master of Education with a concentration in Africentric Leadership (Studies of Lifelong Learning) from Mount Saint Vincent University in Nova Scotia 2010. He has been employed with the NSCC for the past 27 years as Student Advisor and African Canadian Support. He has served as the elected African Nova Scotian Representative of the Halifax Regional School Board and is currently a ministerial appointee on the Provincial Advisory Council on Education serving his second two-year term
    • Trishe Colman: Works for the Seniors Safety Program of Cumberland County as the Seniors’ Safety Coordinator. The Seniors Safety Program of Cumberland County is a safety, information and referral service that focuses on direct service delivery to seniors in the form of home visits, and many group presentations/public education sessions on a wide variety of topics. Trishe’s role involves interacting with many clients via telephone and also in the community.
    • Ian Douglas: Part of a highly skilled team of IT Research Analysts in the Technology Analysis group at the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada. He has over 40 years’ experience with backgrounds in IT security, privacy, data analytics, research, infrastructure, database and software development.
    • Jennifer Jesty: Jennifer was also a member of roundtable on systems design and implementation—see her background above.
    • Gregory Smolynec: Works as the Deputy Commissioner, Policy and Promotion in the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada. His role involves leading the OPC Policy and Promotion team in developing and promoting general, yet practical, information and guidance, and in developing advice on specific initiatives. Prior to his appointment, he served as Director General Strategic Initiatives (DSGI) in the Strategic Joint Staff at National Defence Headquarters. As DGSI, he led the Strategic Outlook function for the Canadian Armed Forces. Gregory began his career with the Department of National Defence as a Strategic Analyst in Defence R&D Canada. He has worked in several organizations within the Department of National Defence as an analyst and has held a series of progressively responsible executive positions the Public Service. He has a Bachelor of Arts in History from McGill University, a Master of Arts in Russian and East European Studies from Carleton University and a Doctorate in History from Duke University.
    • Raymond Théberge: Took office as Commissioner of Official Languages of Canada on January 29, 2018. Prior to this role, he was president and vice chancellor of the Université de Moncton in New Brunswick. He has significant experience with official language minority communities and extensive experience in academia. He has a PhD in linguistics from McGill University in Quebec and a master’s degree in applied linguistics from the University of Ottawa in Ontario.

    Visit the documents section to review related research and policies.

    Watch the Webcast

    May 12, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Roundtables: Public Communications During Emergency Events

  • Critical incident preparation, response, and decision making
    June 1 and 2, 2022

    Roundtable 1: Critical incident preparedness

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:

    • Planning for critical incident response, including emergency preparedness, coordination and resources;
    • The role of organizational learning and adaptation; and
    • Lessons from past reviews of critical incident responses.
    Members include:
    • Dr. Hunter Martaindale: Director of Research for the ALERRT Center at Texas State University.
    • Dr. Kimmo Himberg: Retired at the end of 2021 as the Rector of the national Police University College, after having served the Police of Finland for over 30 years.
    • Supt. Wallace Gossen: Has been with York Regional Police (YRP) for 32 years and is currently the officer in charge of Operational Command.
    • Dr. Bjørn Ivar Kruke: Professor in risk management and societal safety at the Faculty of Science and Technology/Department of Safety, Economics and Planning, University of Stavanger/Norway.
    • Ms. Kerry Murray-Bates: Joined the Toronto Police Service as a Communications Operator, progressing through the ranks over the past 30 years to her current position, Manager of Communications Services.
    • Dept. Chief Stephen MacKinnon: A 31-year officer with Cape Breton Regional Police, presently assigned to Operations as Deputy Chief of Police.
    Roundtable 2: Critical Incident Response: Civilians, 911 And First Responders

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:

    • Civilians as first responders and key informants during a mass casualty incident;
    • The role of 911 call takers and dispatch in a mass casualty incident; and
    • General duty police members: training and techniques for immediate response to mass casualties.
    Members include:
    • Dr. Hunter Martaindale: See biography above.
    • Dr. Bjørn Ivar Kruke: See biography above.
    • Ms. Kerry Murray-Bates: See biography above.
    • Dr. Paul Taylor: Assistant professor in the School of Public Affairs at the University of Colorado Denver.
    Roundtable 3: Critical incident decision-making including stress management

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:

    • Common psychological factors in critical incident decision-making;
    • Training critical incident decision-makers; and
    • The psychological and physiological impacts of stress on the performance of first responders and critical incident decision-makers.
    Members include:
    • Dr. Laurence Alison: Professor of Investigative and Forensic Psychology at the University of Liverpool in the United Kingdom, where he also received his PhD.
    • Dr. Judith Andersen: Associate Professor of Psychology and Affiliated Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto and the Director of the Health, Adaptation, Research on Trauma (HART) Lab at the University of Toronto Mississauga.
    • Supt. Wallace Gossen: Has been with York Regional Police (YRP) for 32 years and is currently the officer in charge of Operational Command.
    • Dr. Matthew McAllister: Assistant Professor of exercise science and the director of the metabolic and applied physiology laboratory at Texas State University.
    • Dr. Neil Shortland: Director for the Center for Terrorism and Security Studies (CTSS) at the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice.
    Roundtable 4: Contextualizing critical incident response: risks and trade-offs

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:

    • Is there a risk that increasing the focus on critical incident training and preparedness will have unintended consequences for other aspects of the police function? If so, can this risk be adequately addressed or mitigated?
    • How should competing priorities for emergency services training and resources be resolved;
    • What is the role of civil society in police training and resource allocation decisions?
    Members include:
    • Dr. Judith Andersen: See biography above.
    • Dr. Paula Di Nota: Postdoctoral Fellow in the Health, Adaptation, Research on Trauma (HART) Lab at the University of Toronto Mississauga.
    • Dr. Benjamin Goold: Professor at the Allard School of Law who holds degrees in law and economics from the University of Tasmania, as well as a BCL and doctorate from the University of Oxford.
    • Dr. Kimmo Himberg: See biography above.
    • Dr. El Jones: Assistant Professor in the department of Political and Canadian studies at Mount Saint Vincent University.
    • Dr. Hunter Martaindale: See biography above.

    Visit the documents section to review related research and policies.

    Watch the Webcast

    Jun. 1, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Roundtables: Critical Incident Response
    Jun. 2, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Critical Incident Response

  • Emergency communications (within RCMP and among responding agencies) and interoperability among agencies
    June 23, 2022

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:
    • Communications within agencies;
    • Communications between agencies;
    • Cultivating interoperability and collaboration.
    Members include:
      • Mr. Todd Brown, Director of Strategic Initiatives for Public Safety and Field Communications (PSFC), Province of Nova Scotia
      • Mr. Terry Canning, Senior Consultant, Maricomm Consulting Ltd.
      • Ms. Hayley Crichton, Executive Director of Public Safety and Security Division, Nova Scotia Department of Justice
      • Mr. Chris Davis, President and Security and Emergency Management Lead, The Lansdowne Consulting Group
      • Mr. Darryl Macdonald, OCC Commander of the L Division Operational Communications Centre
      • Mr. William Moore, Public Safety Project Lead, Halifax Regional Municipality
      • Chief Dwayne Pike, Chief of Police, Amherst Police Department
      • Mr. Lance Valcour, Inspector (retired), Ottawa Police Service

    Visit the documents section to review related research and policies.

    Watch the Webcast

    Jun. 23, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Post-Incident Communications and Support

  • Needs of Family and Community After Mass Casualty Incidents
    June 28, 2022

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:

    • The immediate, short-term, and long-term needs of those impacted by a mass casualty with particular attention of the needs of the families of the victims and members of communities closely connected to a mass casualty;
    • Best practices for addressing those needs; and
    • Existing models that support grief, promote healing and foster resiliency.

    Roundtable Members

    • Dr. Grete Dyb, Adjunct Professor in the Institute of Clinical Medicine at the University of Oslo; Co-Author of Expert Report: Survivors and the Aftermath of the Terrorist Attack on Utøya Island, Norway. Grete Dyb is a professor at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo and Head of research at the Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Oslo, Norway. She has been Principal Investigator of numerous studies on childhood trauma and PTSD in children and adolescents and is past president of the International Society of Traumatic Stress Studies. After the terror attack in Norway in 2011, she initiated the Utøya Study, a longitudinal interview study of youth survivors of the terror attack and their parents.
    • Dr. Jaclyn Schildkraut, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at the State University of New York at Oswego; Author of Expert Report: Supporting Survivors and Communities after Mass Shootings. Dr. Schildkraut holds a PhD in criminal justice from Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas. A national expert on mass shootings, Dr. Schildkraut’s research has been featured by local, national, and international media.
    • Levent Altan, Executive Director of Victim Support in Europe. Mr. Altan has grown the organization into an international network of victim support organizations which carries out advocacy, policy and capacity building for all victims of crime.
    • Mary Fetchet, President and Executive Director of Voices Center for Resilience, an organization she founded following the death of her 24 year-old son on 9/11. A graduate of Columbia University School of Social Work, her 29 years of experience as a clinical social worker influenced VOICES innovative approach to providing long-term support for victims’ families, responders and survivors, and commemorating the lives lost in a meaningful way
    • Serena Lewis, former Northern Zone Grief Coordinator and Provincial Grief Consultant. Ms. Lewis is a registered social worker and holds both a Bachelor of Social Work and Master of Social Work. Since she completed her term, she has continued doing consulting work with teams and groups supporting death and grief literacy as well as psychological safety. She lives and works on the unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq, calling Great Village her home.
    • Dr. Megan McElheran, CEO of Wayfound Mental Health Group and Clinical Psychologist. Dr. McElheran's work focuses exclusively on work with military members and public safety personnel, including members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, municipal police officers, firefighters, corrections officers, medical personnel, and others who are directly or vicariously impacted by traumatic events.
    • Dr. Terry Mitchell, Clinical and Community Psychologist. Dr. Mitchell was the principal investigator of a study on the impact on volunteer first responders and local communities following the Swiss Flight 111 disaster in 1998. She is Professor Emeritus, Wilfrid Laurier University and now is working as a clinical psychologist in private practice, PEI.

    Visit the documents section to review related research and policies.

    Watch the Webcast

    Jun. 28, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Post-Incident Communications and Support

  • Needs of First Responders After Mass Casualty Incidents and Rural Community, Policing and Crime
    June 30, 2022

    Roundtable 1: Needs of First Responders After Mass Casualty Incidents

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:

    • The immediate, short-term, and long-term needs of first and secondary responders exposed to traumatic situations by the virtue of their jobs;
    • Best practices for addressing those needs;
    • Existing models that provide support, promote healing and foster resiliency.
    Members include:
    • Dr. Arija Birze, Senior Research Associate, Institute for Better Health, Trillium Health Partners. Dr. Birze is currently a Senior Research Associate at the Institute for Better Health, Trillium Health Partners. Her postdoctoral work, completed at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, explores the traumatic impacts of violent video evidence among criminal justice professionals. Her PhD, completed at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, examined gender and work as social determinants of health, with a focus on occupational stress and traumatic exposures among Police Communicators including 911 call-takers and dispatchers.
    • Robin Campbell, PhD Candidate at Dalhousie University with research focused on the mental health of volunteer firefighters in rural Nova Scotia. Ms. Campbell is a former volunteer firefighter with Wolfville and Greenwich Fire Departments. She is also an adjunct Professor at Acadia University, an Associate Researcher with FIREWELL and a Reservist with the Canadian Armed Forces.
    • Dr. Julie MacMillan-Devlin, former Program Evaluation Officer of the Operational Stress Injury Clinic in Fredericton, New Brunswick and manager of Psychological Services with the Ontario Provincial Police.
    • Mary Fetchet, President and Executive Director of Voices Center for Resilience, an organization she founded following the death of her 24 year-old son on 9/11. A graduate of Columbia University School of Social Work, her 29 years of experience as a clinical social worker influenced VOICES innovative approach to providing long-term support for victims’ families, responders and survivors, and commemorating the lives lost in a meaningful way
    • Dr. Alexandra Heber, Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. Dr. Heber has over 35 years' experience working in mental health. After a decade working with HIV+ clients and leading an Assertive Community Treatment Team in Toronto, she enrolled in the Canadian Armed Forces in 2006, and deployed to Afghanistan in 2009-10. In 2016, she became inaugural Chief of Psychiatry for Veterans Affairs Canada.
    • Dr. Megan McElheran, CEO & Chief Clinical Psychologist, Wayfound Mental Health Group. Dr. McElheran's work focuses exclusively on work with military members and public safety personnel, including members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, municipal police officers, firefighters, corrections officers, medical personnel, and others who are directly or vicariously impacted by traumatic events.
    • Dr. Deborah Norris, Professor, Department of Family Studies and Gerontology at Mount Saint Vincent University. Informed through her background in family science, critical theories, and qualitative methodology, she teaches courses in family relations, family violence, and research methods. Dr. Norris’ research program focuses on the bi-directional relationship between operational stress injuries and the mental health and well-being of military and veteran families and the families of public safety personnel.
    Roundtable 2: Rural Communities, Policing and Crime

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:

    • Crime in rural communities, including rates and nature of crime committed in rural areas;
    • Firearms in rural communities, with focus on attitudes towards possession and use; and
    • Policing in rural communities, including the unique challenges to policing rural areas, and the core values and delivery of community-based policing.
    Members include:
    • Dr. Karen Foster, Associate Professor of Sociology in the Department Sociology and Social Anthropology, Dalhousie University. Dr. Foster holds the Canada Research Chair in Sustainable Rural Futures for Atlantic Canada. Her research, supported by her Rural Futures Research Centre, focuses on rural economy and society, with active studies on such topics as rural business succession, rural regulatory challenges and how rural families’ caring lives and working lives are intertwined.
    • Dr. Jane McMillan, Chair of the Department of Anthropology, St. Francis Xavier University. Dr. McMillan is the author of the award-winning Truth and Conviction: Donald Marshall Jr. and the Mi’kmaw Quest for Justice. She conducts community-engaged research with First Nations on policing, Indigenous justice, treaty rights implementation and resource governance.
    • Supt. Dan Morrow, Southwest Nova District Policing Officer. Supt. Dan Morrow has been a member of the RCMP for over 29 years and is currently the Southwest Nova District Policing Officer in NS. He has worked in a variety of roles within the RCMP and served in locations including fly-in communities, rural, semi-rural, urban, and nearly two decades in First Nation Communities. For much of his service he was a detachment commander where he was responsible for the operational/administrative functions along with the development of local community policing priorities. His Cree ancestry has provided a personal perspective in the numerous local, provincial, and national committees he has participated in which were predominantly focused on the development of Reconciliation, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion strategies within the RCMP.
    • Dr. Anna Souhami, Senior Lecturer in Criminology and Head of Criminology at the School of Law, University of Edinburgh. Dr. Souhami is an ethnographer specializing in policing and police/community relations. Her current work is an extended study of rural policing and communities in the remote Northern islands of Scotland.
    • Dr. Rosemary Ricciardelli is Professor (PhD, Sociology) in the School of Maritime Studies and Research Chair in Safety, Security, and Wellness, at Memorial University’s Fisheries and Marine Institute. Elected to the Royal Society of Canada, her research centers on evolving understandings of gender, vulnerabilities, risk, and experiences and issues within different facets of the criminal justice system and among mariners. She has published 11 books, over 190 journal articles and nearly 50 chapters all in the areas of PSP, criminalized persons, and wellness – broadly defined. As a sex and gender researcher, her interests lay in the social health, identity construction, and lived experiences of individuals.
    • Dr. Rick Ruddell, Law Foundation of Saskatchewan Chair in Police Studies, University of Regina. A graduate of the Ph.D. program in Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri - St. Louis, Dr. Ruddell's research has focused upon policing, criminal justice policy, and youth justice.
    • Dr. Signa Daum Shanks, Associate Professor, University of Ottawa. Dr. Daum Shanks is a member of the Indigenous Bar Association and is on the Board of Directors for the Ontario Bar Association. In 2018, she organized a pop-up think-tank regarding the criminal trial of Gerald Stanley in Saskatchewan which examined the role of property law, discrimination against Indigenous Peoples, rural policing and the base knowledge community members have about the legal system.

    Visit the documents section to review related research and policies.

    Watch the Webcast

    Jun. 30, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Rural Community Safety and Policing

  • Rurality and Community Well-Being
    July 6, 2022

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:
    • culture and attitudes of rural life in Nova Scotia;
    • limited and differential service delivery in rural areas;
    • health and safety of those working in rural communities and how the rural context affects their working lives.
    Members include:
    • Ms. Robin Campbell, PhD Candidate at Dalhousie University with research focused on the mental health of volunteer firefighters in rural Nova Scotia. Campbell is a former volunteer firefighter with Wolfville and Greenwich Fire Departments. She is an adjunct Professor at Acadia University, Associate Researcher with FIREWELL and Reservist with the Canadian Armed Forces.
    • Ms. Madonna Doucette, Director, Youth Project. Doucette is a grassroots community organizer from Cape Breton with deep roots in the non-profit sector of the CBRM. She refers to herself as a professional homosexual as she has been a rural queer educator for 12 years, most recently being promoted as Director with the Youth Project. In 2022, under her leadership, the Youth Project opened up a new youth drop-in centre for 2SLGBTQ+ youth and their allies in downtown Sydney.
    • Dr. Karen Foster, Associate Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology, Dalhousie University. She holds the Canada Research Chair in Sustainable Rural Futures for Atlantic Canada. Her research, supported by her Rural Futures Research Centre, focuses on rural economy and society, with active studies on such topics as rural business succession, rural regulatory challenges, local food production, and how rural families’ caring lives and working lives are intertwined.
    • Dr. Lesley Frank, Professor at Acadia University and researcher in the areas of family and children’s poverty, food insecurity, health inequality and social welfare and policy. She has single authored or co-authored the Child and Family Poverty Report Card for over two decades. Preceding her academic career, she spent several years providing family resources support to families living in low-income circumstances in rural Nova Scotia.
    • Dr. Marilyn MacDonald, Professor at Dalhousie University’s School of Nursing, Director of JBI Centre of Excellence. Dr. Macdonald’s program of research is focused on knowledge synthesis related to the older person and has clinical and research experience in home care.

    Visit the documents section to review related research and policies.

    Watch the Webcast

    Jul. 6, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Rurality and Community Well-Being

  • Prediction and Prevention of Mass Casualty Events and Psychology/Sociology of Perpetrators
    July 14, 2022

    Roundtable 1: Prediction and Prevention of Mass Casualty Events

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:

    • Whether mass casualties can be predicted, and whether effective risk assessment models exist.
    • The availability of early intervention/preventative strategies given the state of our knowledge about perpetrators of mass casualties.
    • Steps Canadian institutions and citizens can take to prevent these events, as much as possible, in the future.
    Members include:
    • Professor Benjamin Berger: Professor and York Research Chair in Pluralism and Public Law at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University. He served as judicial law clerk to the former Chief Justice of Canada, the Rt. Honourable Beverley McLachlin, holds a JSD and LLM from Yale University, where he studied as a Fulbright Scholar, and is a member of the Royal Society of Canada. His areas of research and teaching specialization are criminal and constitutional law and theory, the law of evidence, and law and religion, and he has written on issues of mental disorder and criminal responsibility.
    • Dr. Myrna Lashley: Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University. She is an internationally recognized clinical, teaching and research authority in cultural psychology. In addition, she serves as an expert psychological consultant to institutions, including the juvenile justice system. From 2008 to 2017, she was the Chair of the Cross Cultural Roundtable on Security, an advisory council to the federal government on issues concerning terrorism.
    • Professor Nikolas Rose: Former Professor of Sociology and the founding Head of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at King’s College London. He was the Co-Founder and Co-Director of King’s ESRC Centre for Society and Mental Health, the UK’s first major research centre on the social dimensions of mental distress. His current research concerns the role of the life sciences and neurosciences in changing conceptions of human identity, reshaping ideas of normality and pathology, and shifting ways of thinking about and governing human beings, in particular in relation to mental life and mental health.
    • Professor George Szmukler: Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry and Society, King’s College London. He is now retired from psychiatric practice, which was as a general psychiatrist in a community setting. He continues to have a special interest in mental health law and human rights, especially in relation to coercive interventions and involuntary treatment in mental health care, and in the role of risk assessment, and its limitations, in preventing harms to self or others involving people with mental health problems.
    • Robert S. Wright: Acting Executive Director, African Nova Scotian Justice Institute. His 31-year career has spanned the fields of education, child welfare, forensic mental health, trauma, sexual violence, and cultural competence. A “clinician/academic/administrator,” he has always integrated his work delivering direct practice clinical service to clients with teaching and supervising interns and promoting lasting systemic change through social policy advocacy. His extensive pro bono work gave birth to The Peoples' Counselling Clinic, a non-profit mental health clinic located in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
    Roundtable 2: Definitions and Psychology/Sociology of Perpetrators of Mass Casualty Events

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:

    • How mass casualties are defined, the debates regarding its definition, and why how we define mass casualties matters.
    • Identifying the perpetrators of mass casualties, including their common characteristics and how gender is relevant to patterns of perpetration.
    • Early intervention and prevention strategies and the role of adverse childhood experiences in the perpetration of violence.
    Members include:
    • Tristan Bridges: Associate Professor and Vice Chair of the Sociology Department and Faculty Affiliate with the Feminist Studies Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He currently serves as Co-Editor of the journal Men and Masculinities. He received his PhD in Sociology from the University of Virginia. Dr. Bridges' research is broadly concerned with shifts in gender and sexual identities focusing on inequalities and violence.
    • Professor David C Hofmann: Associate Professor of Sociology and the Director of the Criminology and Criminal Justice Program at the University of New Brunswick. He is a nationally-recognized expert on far-right extremism and violence, and has an extensive experience conducting funded research in this area with governmental partners.
    • Dr. Angelique Jenney: Associate Professor and the Wood’s Home Research Chair in Children’s Mental Health in the Faculty of Social Work at the University of Calgary. Dr. Jenney has 25 years of experience in intervention and prevention services within the gender-based violence, child protection and children’s mental health sectors. Her community-based research and practice interests focus on the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) on children and families including: family-based interventions for childhood trauma; child protection responses to IPV cases; and the use of reflective, simulation-based learning approaches to training both social work students and practitioners in the field.
    • Tara Leigh Tober: Lecturer in the Sociology Department at the University California, Santa Barbara. She is a cultural sociologist who studies the way we navigate difficult pasts and events.

    Visit the documents section to review related research and policies.

    Watch the Webcast

    Jul. 14, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Violence: understanding mass casualties and the role of gender-based and intimate partner violence

  • Exploring the Connections: Mass Casualties, IPV, GBV and Family Violence
    July 18, 2022

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:
    • The relationship between forms of violent behaviour that tend to be understood as “private” such as intimate partner violence, gender-based violence and family violence and mass casualties that are characterized as “public” violence.
    • How moving away from the private/public distinction would generate new understandings of potential preventative strategies, interventions, and responses to mass casualties.
    • Research into the underlying causes of and factors that enable intimate partner violence, gender-based violence, family violence, and mass casualty incidents, and the relevance of this research to policy-making.
    Members include:
    • Dr. Wendy Cukier: Professor in Ted Rogers School of Management at Toronto Metropolitan University. Wendy Cukier also teaches and supervises in the Graduate Program on Public Policy. She is the coauthor, with Vic Sidel, past president of the American Public Health Association, of the book The Global Gun Epidemic: From Saturday Night Special's to AK 47 and the author of many articles, reports and presentations on aspects of gun violence. She has served on a number of expert panels and provided expert testimony on cases related to firearms violence, death and injury as well as systemic discrimination. She is the co-founder and president of the Coalition for Gun Control which is supported by more than 200 organizations including victims groups, women's groups, policing, health care and community organizations. She has a PhD in Management Science, an MBA, MA and two honourary degrees and has received many awards in recognition of her community work.
    • Dr. Amanda Dale: Activist, legal scholar, non-profit sector consultant, and former Executive Director of the Barbra Schlifer Clinic. Amanda is best known for her decade as the Executive Director of the Barbra Schlifer Clinic, Canada’s comprehensive gender-based violence legal, counselling and language interpretation clinic in Toronto. Amanda has 40 years experience working in municipal, provincial, national, international, multicultural, urban, and remote contexts including an advanced role in direct access to justice service development, test case litigation, Charter challenges and appellate work, as well as international human rights advocacy. Amanda is the 2013 recipient of the YWCA Woman of Distinction Award for Social Justice. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree, Joint Specialist in Political Science and Women’s and Gender Studies; a Masters in Social and Political Thought from the University of Sussex; a Masters in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford (MSt); and a Ph.D. from Osgoode Hall Law School.
    • Dr. Myrna Dawson: Professor of Sociology and Research Leadership Chair, College of Social and Applied Human Sciences, University of Guelph. She is the Founder and Director of the Centre for the Study of Social and Legal Responses to Violence (CSSLRV; www.violenceresearch.ca) and the Canadian Femicide Observatory for Justice & Accountability (CFOJA; www.femicideincanada.ca). For 10 years, Dawson held a Canada Research Chair in Public Policy in Criminal Justice (2008-2018). She has spent more than two decades researching social and legal responses to violence with emphasis on violence against women, children, femicide and filicide.
    • Dr. JaneMaree Maher: Professor in the Centre for Women’s Studies and Gender Research, Sociology, and Associate Dean Graduate Research in the Faculty of Arts at Monash University. JaneMaree’s research is focused in three key areas of gendered social science: paid and unpaid work, food, care and family structures, and gendered violences. The intensification and responsibilisation of women’s mothering in food and family violence have been central to her recent research.
    • Dr. Alison Marganski: Associate Professor and Director of Criminology at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, New York, USA. Her research focuses on the intersection of gender and violence using interdisciplinary and intersectional approaches. She is an internationally recognized expert who has published on various topics including but not limited to cyber/technology-facilitated violence, intimate partner violence, sexual violence, and mass murder, and she has experience working with survivors of violence, persons who have perpetrated violence, and justice-related professionals.
    • Dr. Jude McCulloch: Criminologist and experienced legal practitioner; Inaugural Director of the Monash Gender and Family Violence Prevention Centre. She was the inaugural Director of the Monash Gender and Family Violence Prevention Centre. Her research focuses on family violence, policing and the connections between family violence and mass casualty attacks. Her research includes numerous contracted projects evaluating the effectiveness of the implementation of the Victorian Family Violence Royal Commission (2016) recommendations.
    • Dr. Barbara Perry: Professor in the Faculty of Social Science and Humanities at Ontario Tech University, and the Director of the Centre on Hate, Bias and Extremism. She also holds a UNESCO Chair in Hate Studies, a field in which she has written extensively. She is generally recognized as the leading Canadian expert on hate crime and right-wing extremism. She is regularly called upon by policy makers, practitioners, and local, national and international media as an expert on hate crime and right-wing extremism.

    Visit the documents section to review related research and policies.

    Watch the Webcast

    Jul. 18, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Violence: understanding mass casualties and the role of gender-based and intimate partner violence

  • Police and institutional understanding and responses: IPV, GBV, Family and Sexual Violence
    July 20, 2022

    Roundtable 1: IPV, GBV and Family Violence: Police and institutional understanding and responses to intimate partner violence and family violence

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:

    • The barriers to effective police and other institutional responses to intimate partner violence and family violence
    • Cultural aspects of these barriers and how can they be addressed
    • Promising and best practices in police and institutional responses (Canadian and international)
    Members include:
    • Dr. Lori Chambers: Professor in the Department of Gender and Women's Studies at Lakehead University, Thunder Bay campus. She teaches courses in feminist theory, gender-based violence, the history of women and the law, and reproductive justice. She is the author of 4 monographs and over 75 articles and book chapters and is an expert in intimate partner abuse and coercive control.
    • Dr. Patrina Duhaney: Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Social Work at the University of Calgary. Her research focuses on Black women’s experiences of intimate partner violence and with police. Dr. Duhaney has over 14 years of experience working with various marginalized populations, including women and children exposed to IPV, youth in conflict with the law, children, youth and adults with multiple disabilities and young parents.
    • Dr. Carmen Gill: Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of New Brunswick. Dr. Gill works in partnership with police agencies in Canada. Her research focuses on police intervention in intimate partner violence (IPV), domestic homicide and treatment of perpetrators and victims through the criminal justice system. Dr. Carmen Gill is currently leading a national research project entitled: Coercive control, risk assessment and evidence of intimate partner violence: Police response.
    • Dr. Nancy Ross: Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work, Dalhousie University and has social work degrees from Dalhousie University and a PhD in Peace Studies and International Development from Bradford University, UK. Her previous work as a clinical therapist in Mental Health and Addiction Services motivates her research interests in calling attention to the prevalence and impacts of adverse childhood experiences and gendered violence and in defining better measures of intervention and prevention. She applies a feminist peacebuilding and violence and trauma-informed lens to her work.
    Roundtable 2: Police and institutional understanding and responses to sexual violence and other forms of gender-based violence

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:

    • The barriers to effective police and other institutional responses to sexual violence and other forms of gender-based violence
    • The cultural aspects of these barriers and how can they be addressed
    • Promising and best practices in police and institutional responses (Canadian and international)
    Members include:
    • Ms. Emilie Coyle: Executive Director of the Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies. She is a lawyer, whose experience in civil society has taken her from Canada’s west, to the east, and she now makes her home in Ottawa with her two children – Maia and Niko – and her partner, Adam. Emilie is passionate about the power of community and actively pursues ways to animate community-building.
    • Professor Isabel Grant: Professor of law at the Allard School of Law at the University of British Columbia. She specializes in violence against women and girls with a particular interest in disability. She teaches courses on homicide, sentencing and mental health law. She is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.
    • Ms. Lana MacLean: Practicing clinical social worker with over 25 years of experience work with members of the African, Black and Caribbean (ABC) in Nova Scotia and Ontario. Lana holds a Bachelor in Arts in Community studies and a bachelor and Masters degree in social work. Lana has worked with Black women and Black youth negatively impacted in the area of IVP and sexualized violence. Lana works from a race and trauma inform lens as part of her clinical formulations and treatment. Lana has been the co-creator of Impact of Race and Cultural Impact Assessment. Presently, Lana has been blitzing IRCA in Family Court matters.
    • Ms. Sunny Marriner: The National Project Lead for the Improving Institutional Accountability Project which reviews police and criminal justice system responses to sexual violence. She is the co-creator of the Violence Against Women Case Review (VACR) model of independent review of police investigation and charging decisions, which is currently in use in 28 Canadian communities across five provinces. Sunny has provided frontline advocacy and counselling to survivors of sexual violence for over 25 years through Canada's network of independent, community-run sexual assault centres, including with the Sexual Assault Support Centre of Ottawa and as the former executive director of the Ottawa Rape Crisis Centre. Sunny serves in numerous provincial and national advisory roles for best practices in legal and police responses to sexual violence, particularly with marginalized and criminalized women and girls.
    • Ms. Deepa Mattoo: Executive Director of the Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic as well as an Adjunct Professor at Osgoode Hall Law School. Deepa’s work is focused on ending gender-based violence, including forced marriage. Deepa has appeared before parliamentary committees and United Nations civil society meetings, commissions, and courts on human rights issues and has provided education to those working with forced marriage survivors, racialized non-status women, and immigration law clients within the context of gender-based violence.
    • Dr. Pamela Palmater: Mi'kmaw lawyer and member of Eel River Bar First Nation. She has a doctorate in law from Dalhousie University; has been a lawyer in good standing for 23 years; and previously worked as senior legal counsel for Justice Canada in the Atlantic Region. She currently serves as Professor and Chair in Indigenous Governance at Toronto Metropolitan University. Her extensive research on the Royal Canadian Mounted Police formed the basis of her submissions to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls; her submissions to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on violence against women; and her contributions as co-author on the recent report entitled "The Toxic Culture of the RCMP: Misogyny, Racism, and Violence Against Women in Canada's National Police Force.

    Visit the documents section to review related research and policies.

    Watch the Webcast

    Jul. 20, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Violence: understanding mass casualties and the role of gender-based and intimate partner violence

  • Personal and Community Responses: IPV, GBV and Family Violence
    July 21, 2022

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:
    • What do we know about the social and material conditions that nurture and sustain gender-based violence? How can these conditions be addressed/transformed?
    • What are the barriers to community-based interventions and support, particularly in the rural context? How can these barriers be addressed?
    • What support services are available to women who experience these forms of violence?
    • What does work? What are some of the promising/best practices with respect to personal and community responses? (Canadian and International)
    Members include:
    • Ms. Pamela Cross: Feminist lawyer and the Legal Director at Luke's Place Support and Resource Centre in Durham Region, Ontario. Her work focuses on gender-based violence, in particular, intimate partner abuse, and its intersections with legal systems. She writes and speaks extensively on this topic and recently appeared as an expert witness at an inquest into a triple femicide in Ontario.
    • Dr. Deborah Doherty: Executive Director (Ret.), Public Legal Education and Information Service of New Brunswick. During her 30-year career she conducted numerous family violence research studies that examined the clustering of risks factors associated with intimate partner violence and/or female domestic homicide. She was the co-principal researcher on a ground-breaking study examining family violence on the farm and in rural communities.
    • Ms. Emma Halpern: Lawyer, activist and the Executive Director of the Elizabeth Fry Society of Mainland NS (EFMNS). In this role she works to address the systemic issues that criminalize women and gender diverse people. EFMNS has urban and rural offices and regularly works to monitor the conditions of confinement for those incarcerated in the Prison for Women in Truro, NS. Prior to this role Emma was the Equity and Access Officer at the Nova Scotia Barristers' Society and also ran a number of restorative justice initiatives throughout the province.
    • Professor Janet Mosher: Associate Professor of Law at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University and Co-Director of the Feminist Advocacy: Ending Violence Against Women Clinical Program. For more than two decades her research has focused on intimate partner violence and the responses of various legal domains, including criminal, family, immigration, refugee, and child welfare law. Her current research addresses the access to justice barriers survivors encounter, particularly when they must navigate multiple legal domains.
    • Ms. Lorraine Whitman: Grand Mother White Sea turtle and former President of Native Women Association of Canada. Grand Daughter of the late Chief Louis Peters and daughter of late Chief Joseph Peters and Elder Doris nee Brooks. Born and raised in Middleton, Nova Scotia and graduated from Grant MacEwan Community College and University of Alberta as a Rehabilitation Practitioner. Lorraine had worked on her First Nation community of Glooscap for a total of 30 years, 17 years as an elected councillor, Social Development Officer, Education Councillor, and continued her education at Yellowquill College as a Diabetes Initiative Worker. In 2017, Lorraine was elected as the President of Nova Scotia Native Womens Association and in 2019 Lorraine was elected as the President for Native Women Association of Canada. Throughout her working career she has advocated and defending the rights for the Indigenous people and the women, girls and gender diverse community. Over the past 5 years she has concentrated on the Missing Murdered indigenous Women and Girls.
    • Dr. Rachel Zellars: Lawyer, Senior Research Fellow and Associate Professor at Saint Mary's University. Her research focuses the history of gender-based violence (GBV) in the lives of Black women in North America and transformative justice approaches to GBV and other forms of violence. She also serves as the Advisory Board Chair for Advancing Gender Equity for Black Women, Girls and Gender Diverse Peoples in Canada, a WAGE funded project focused on transformative justice and the law. For the last year, she served as a research fellow in the Canada School of Public Service.

    Visit the documents section to review related research and policies.

    Watch the Webcast

    Jul. 21, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Violence: understanding mass casualties and the role of gender-based and intimate partner violence

  • Contemporary Community Policing, Safety and Well-being / The Structure of Policing in Nova Scotia
    September 7 & 8, 2022

    Roundtable 1: Contemporary Community Policing, Community Safety and Well-being

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:
    • Best practices for community policing;
    • Necessary considerations for inclusive community policing and safety that is responsive to diversity and diverse needs;
    • Approaches to community safety that are grounded in community engagement and community mobilization.
    Members include:
    • Mr. Cal Corley: Mr. Corley is the CEO of the Community Safety Knowledge Alliance (CKSA) and former Assistant Commissioner of the RCMP. From 2008 – 2014, he was head of the Canadian Police College and also served as the RCMP Senior Envoy to Mexico and the Americas. Over the course of his career, he gained extensive experience in both operations and executive management, serving in such areas as detachment policing, national security, criminal intelligence, drug enforcement, human resources and leading strategic reform initiatives.
    • Dr. Sulaimon Giwa: Dr. Giwa is the endowed chair in criminology and criminal justice at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, as well as an associate professor and associate dean of social work at Memorial University. He has a diverse background in the criminal justice system including experience as a community parole officer at an Indigenous healing lodge and as a clinical case manager for a gang exit initiative. His research on racial profiling practices in policing has included invited consultations and internships with Correctional Services Canada and several police forces. He was also commissioned by the Independent Civilian Review of Missing Persons Investigations in 2020 to examine systemic bias in police investigations involving racialized 2SLGBTQIA+ persons, after the serial murders of several gay men of colour in Toronto between 2010 and 2017.
    • Chief Mark Kane: Chief Kane was originally from the United Kingdom where he was a serving police officer. He then came to
      Canada after being recruited by Calgary Police Service. He then went to Manitoba as police Chief before arriving in Nova Scotia late in 2020. Chief Kane also helped set up a very successful multi-agency task force and was asked to be a guest keynote speaker to the National Health Conference on Collaborative partnerships in 2011. He was also able to participate in the national gang conference in Chicago and had an informative visit with the Los Angeles Police Service to see how their community Cadet program has helped reach communities in the greater Los Angeles area. Chief Kane has also worked on unique community-based programs and is also part of the Restorative Justice Conference taking part later this year.
    • Dr. Jamie Livingston: Dr. Livingston is an Associate Professor in the Department of Criminology at Saint Mary’s University. His research examines issues at the intersection of the mental health, substance use, and criminal justice systems. Dr. Livingston is currently studying community-based approaches for responding without the police to people experiencing a mental health crisis.
    • Professor Denise Martin: Professor Martin is Professor of Criminology at Abertay University in Scotland and Associate Director of the Scottish Institute of Police Research. She has been researching police related issues for over 15 years on various topics, including police preventative partnerships, emergency service collaboration and learning and development. She has worked with a range of agencies including Police Scotland and the Scottish Prison Service.
    • Dr. Chris Murphy: Dr. Chris Murphy has been involved in research, teaching, publishing and consulting on policing policy and reform in Canada for over 40 years. He did his PhD Dissertation on small town RCMP and Municipal Policing in Nova Scotia. He was a senior policy researcher for the federal government’s initiative on community policing and recently retired after 30 years as Professor of Sociology at Dalhousie University and the University of King’s College.
    • Dr. Hugh C. Russell: Dr. Russell is a social psychologist with over 50 years of experience enabling communities to take more responsibility for their own development and well-being. Author of Transforming Community Policing: Mobilization, Engagement and Collaboration (Emond Publishing, 2017), Russell has spent the last 30 years working with police and other security services on developing strategies for increasing community safety. He is the architect of a community policing model, and community safety and well-being planning model, that are being adapted across Canada.
    • Dr. Amy Siciliano: As Public Safety Advisor for Halifax Regional Municipality, Amy leads the municipality in its journey toward holistic, collaborative approaches to community safety and wellbeing. She is passionate about championing community-led solutions to local problems, and creative ways to harness the inherent strengths of community. With a PhD in Urban Geography, she is well skilled at synthesizing experiential knowledge with scientific research to bring a robust evidence-base to decision-making.
    Participant Representatives - Afternoon Session

    During this portion of the roundtable, Participant representatives will be invited to join the discussion with roundtable members. Conversation will continue within the roundtable format.

    • Ms. Hayley Crichton, Executive Director, Public Safety and Security Division - Nominated by: Department of Justice Nova Scotia
    • Ms. Dawn Ferris, Executive Director, Autumn House
    • Kristina Fifield, Trauma Therapist, Avalon Centre
    • Dr. El Jones, Assistant Professor, Mount Saint Vincent University - Nominated by: BC Civil Liberties Association & East Coast Prison Justice Society
    • Ms. Mukisa Kakembo, Elizabeth Fry Society of Mainland Nova Scotia - Nominated by: Elizabeth Fry Society of Mainland Nova Scotia
    • Insp. Kurtis Kamotzki, District Policing Officer in H Divison - Nominated by: Department of Justice Canada
    • Mr. Hubert Martin, Nova Scotia H-Division South West District - Nominated by: National Police Federation
    • Mr. Steve Mills, Retired RCMP Officer - Nominated by: RCMP Veterans

    Visit the documents section to review related research and policies.


    Roundtable 2: The Structure of Policing in Nova Scotia

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:
    • The present structure of policing in Nova Scotia, and its history
    • Evaluating the current structure of policing in Nova Scotia
    • Potential approaches for reform or restructuring policing in Nova Scotia
    Members include:
    • Chief James Butler: Mr. Butler is currently the Chief of Police for the Kentville Police Service and has been in this role just under 1 year. He was briefly a Constable In Kentville before assuming this role (about 9 months) He has come full circle as he was a Constable In Kentville for a term in 1992. Chief James Butler had retired from the Halifax Regional Police at the end of 2020, in the position of Deputy Chief- Support. He was in HRP for 28 years He was very fortunate to assume a variety of roles and was exposed to just about every aspect of policing. The vast majority of his early career was spent between Patrol and in the Criminal Investigation Division. He was the Professional Standards officer for over 1 year. As a senior officer he was the first Information Management Officer, a Patrol Support Officer and then a short period as the Superintendent of CID before promotion to Deputy Chief.
    • Mr. Harry Critchley: Mr. Critchley recently graduated from the Schulich School of Law and he is now an Articled Clerk in the Dartmouth Criminal Office at Nova Scotia Legal Aid. Prior to earning his JD, he spent several years as an educator and researcher for several organizations, including the Access to Justice and Law Reform Institute of Nova Scotia. Mr. Critchley serves on the Board of Police Commissioners for HRM. Mr. Critchley also serves as co-chair of the East Coast Prison Justice Society and Vice Chair of the Board of Directors for the Elizabeth Fry Society of Mainland Nova Scotia.
    • Ms. Hayley Crichton: Ms. Crichton is originally from Toronto, Ontario, where she received her Bachelor of Arts honours degree from York University. Hayley then moved to Newfoundland and Labrador to pursue a Masters Degree and Doctorate in sociology, specializing in criminal justice. Hayley joined the Nova Scotia Department of Justice approximately 2 years ago after gaining experience as a published academic, university instructor, policy consultant and public servant. She is currently the Executive Director of Public Safety and Security Division, acting in the role since May 2021 and permanently appointed November 2021.
    • Ms. Heidi Marshall: Ms. Marshall is a member of Membertou First Nation; she has been involved with implementation of the Marshall Report recommendations in Nova Scotia. She is the co-founder of the Jane Paul Indigenous Resource Centre in Sydney, NS, which is the only centre east of Montreal specifically for Indigenous women in high-risk situations, living off-reserve. She also serves as president of the Mi'kmaq Circle of Hope Society, a non-profit Society that supports and passes on Indigenous grandmothers’ knowledge, practices and traditions. Ms. Marshall has a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Political Science from Cape Breton University, a Bachelor of Law at Dalhousie University and a Masters of Education from Mount Saint Vincent University.
    • Dr. L. Jane McMillan: Dr. McMillan is Chair of the Department of Anthropology, and the Special Advisor, Indigenous Research and Learning Partnerships, at St. Francis Xavier University. She is the author of the award-winning Truth and Conviction: Donald Marshall Jr. and the Mi’kmaw Quest for Justice. She conducts community-engaged research with First Nations on policing, Indigenous justice, treaty rights implementation and resource governance.
    • Retired Deputy Chief William Moore (O.O.M.): Mr. Moore is presently the Public Safety Project Lead at Halifax Regional Municipality. He was formerly the Executive Director of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police and previous to that was the Deputy Chief of Police in Halifax. Throughout his policing career, his work has focused on matters of emergency communications and technology. He was the chair of the Canadian Interoperability Technology Interest Group (CITIG) from 2010 to 2014, a non-profit focused on increasing interoperability within emergency response partners within Canada and abroad. He also managed the design, build and transition to Integrated Emergency Services, the 911 call-taking and police/fire dispatch in Halifax. Mr. Moore holds a master’s degree in criminology from Cambridge University and a BSc. In Psychology from Dalhousie University.
    • Dr. Scot Wortley: Dr. Wortley is a Professor in the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies at the University of Toronto. He has studied police stop and search activities, use of force, and public attitudes toward police. Dr. Wortley has published a number of research studies and reports on these topics, including a 2019 report for the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission.
    Participant Representatives - Afternoon Session

    During this portion of the roundtable, Participant representatives will be invited to join this discussion with roundtable members. Conversation will continue within the roundtable format.

    • Ms. Emma Arnold, Elizabeth Fry Society of Mainland Nova Scotia - Nominated by: Elizabeth Fry Society of Mainland Nova Scotia
    • C/Supt Darren Campbell, Former “H” Divison Support Services Officer - Nominated by: RCMP
    • Ms. Danielle Desjardins, “H” Divison Planning - Nominated by: RCMP
    • Ms. Dawn Ferris, Executive Director, Autumn House
    • Ms. Kristina Fifield, Trauma Therapist, Avalon Centre
    • Mr. Brian Carter, Retired RCMP Officer - Nominated by: RCMP Veterans
    • Chief Mark Kane, Annapolis Royal Police - Nominated by: Nova Scotia Chiefs of Police Association
    • Chief Daniel J. Kinsella, Halifax Regional Police - Nominated by: Halifax Regional Police
    • Mr. Benjamin Perryman - Nominated by: BC Civil Liberties Association & East Coast Prison Justice Society
    • Supt. Dustine Rodier, “H” Divison Admin & Personnel - Nominated by: RCMP
    • Mr. Rob Stone, A/Director General, Strategic Policing Agreements Branch - Nominated by: RCMP
    • Mr. Marc Taschereau , Manager, Contract Policing Policy - Nominated by: Public Safety Canada
    • Ms. Julie Thompson, Director General, Policing Policy Directorate - Nominated by: Public Safety Canada

    Watch the Webcast

    Sep. 7, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Roundtable: Contemporary Community Policing, Community Safety and Well-being
    Sep. 8, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Roundtable: Structure of Policing in Nova Scotia

  • Police oversight, supervision and accountability
    September 14, 2022

    This roundtable will address the following core themes:
    • The two elements of oversight of policing, namely governance and accountability.
    • The relationships between oversight, supervision, discretion and independence of operational decision-making.
    • Effective models of oversight including the regulation of discretion and ensuring effective oversight while preserving operational independence.
    Key terms:
    • Governance of policing: The legal and structural framework within which police provide services and which ensures the police fulfil its function under the law and while respecting community norms. Various models of governance exist within Canadian policing, from civilian boards (e.g. Toronto Police Service) to national governance that reports directly to the Minister of Public Safety (RCMP). In many Canadian provinces, including Nova Scotia, more than one governance system is in effect.
    • Accountability in policing: The processes by which individual and institutional police conduct is reviewed and evaluated. It includes the mechanisms by which the public can make complaints about police. These matters have been addressed in many prior reports, documented in the Environmental Scan of Prior Recommendations.
    Members include:
    • Dr. Holly Campeau: Assistant Professor of Sociology and Criminology at the University of Alberta, specializing in the intersection between criminology, cultural sociology and sociology of law. She is also Senior Researcher with the Global Justice Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto, focusing on justice reform. Dr. Campeau received her PhD (2016) in Sociology from the University of Toronto, where she split her time between the Department of Sociology and the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies. Her research involves fieldwork and qualitative methods to examine the cultural structures and processes underlying law, policing and criminal justice.
    • Dr. Benjamin Goold: Professor at the Allard School of Law and holds degrees in law and economics from the University of Tasmania, as well as a BCL and doctorate from the University of Oxford. His major research interests include privacy rights, the use of surveillance technologies by the police and intelligence communities, and the rhetoric and language of human rights. Professor Goold has served as Specialist Legal Advisor to a major House of Lords inquiry into surveillance and data collection in Britain, and is currently a member of the BC Information and Privacy Commissioner's External Advisory Board.
    • Ms. Jihyun Kwon: PhD Candidate in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies at the University of Toronto. Her doctoral research focuses on accountability, oversight, and administrative governance of police conduct in Ontario. She was the Advisor to the Independent Expert at the Ministry of the Solicitor General in Ontario, where she worked to help enforce the terms of a human rights consent order in detention and correctional facilities.
    • Ms. Michelaine Lahaie: Appointed as Chairperson of the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP on January 2, 2019. Ms. Lahaie is a 30-year veteran of the Canadian Armed Forces, retiring at the rank of Commander. During her time in service, she was posted to Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Esquimalt, Halifax, Kingston, and the National Capital Region. She participated in multiple NATO exercises, and deployments with the Royal Canadian Navy, including Operation SHARP GUARD, a naval blockade assisting United Nations’ peacekeeping efforts in Yugoslavia, and OPERATION APOLLO, Canada’s military contribution to the United States-led international campaign against terrorism.
    • Dr. Bethan Loftus: Senior Lecturer in Criminology and Criminal Justice at Bangor University. Her research focuses on various aspects of policing and security, with an emphasis on police culture.
    • Professor Kent Roach: Professor of Law at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto and of Yale, and a former law clerk to Justice Bertha Wilson of the Supreme Court of Canada. Professor Roach has been editor-in-chief of the Criminal Law Quarterly since 1998. In 2002, he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. In 2013, he was one of four academics awarded a Trudeau Fellowship in recognition of his research and social contributions. In 2015, he was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada. In 2016, named (with Craig Forcese) one of the top 25 influential lawyers in Canada (change-maker category) by Canadian Lawyer. He was awarded the Molson Prize for the social sciences and humanities in 2017.
    • Dr. Kanika Samuels-Wortley: Assistant Professor at Toronto Metropolitan University and Visiting Fellow at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) at Australian National University. Her research explores the intersection of race, racism and the criminal justice system and seeks to better understand how racial bias and discrimination impact Black and Indigenous peoples’ experience and perceptions of law enforcement in Canada. Dr. Samuels-Wortley’s research has been published in various national and international peer-reviewed journals. She has presented her research on systemic racism in policing in both provincial and federal inquiries, including the House of Commons Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security.
    Participant Representatives - Afternoon Session

    During this portion of the roundtable, Participant representatives will be invited to join this discussion with roundtable members. Conversation will continue within the roundtable format.

    • Ms. Emma Arnold, Elizabeth Fry Society of Mainland Nova Scotia - Nominated by: Elizabeth Fry Society of Mainland Nova Scotia
    • A/Comm Alfredo Bangloy, Director, National Conduct Management Section -
      Nominated by: RCMP
    • S/Sgt. Wes Blair, EMRO, H Division RCMP - Nominated by: RCMP
    • Mr. Luc Cote, Team Commander, Serious Incident Response Team - Nominated by: SiRT
    • Ms. Hayley Crichton, Executive Director, Public Safety and Security Division - Nominated by: Department of Justice Canada
    • Ms. Kristina Fifield, Trauma Therapist, Avalon Centre - Nominated by: Gender Coalition (Avalon Sexual Assault Centre, LEAF and Wellness Within)
    • Ms. Joanne Gibb, Senior Director of Strategic Operations and Policy, Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP - Nominated by: Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP
    • Ms. Meghan McDermott, Policy Director - Nominated by: BC Civil Liberties Association & East Coast Prison Justice Society
    • Supt Corry Pyne, Professional Responsibility Officer - Nominated by: RCMP
    • Ms. Melinda Sellers, Senior Advisor, Policy Development - Nominated by: Public Safety Canada
    • Ms. Emily Stewart, Executive Director of Third Place - Nominated by: THANS/WSC/Be The Peace
    • Commissioner Lindell Smith, Board Chair, The Board of Police Commissioners - Nominated by: Halifax Regional Municipality
    • Ms. Julie Thompson, Director General Policing Policy Directorate - Nominated by: Public Safety Canada

    Watch the Webcast

    Sep. 14, 2022 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. - Roundtable: Police Oversight, Supervision and Accountability

Content Warning: The following video contains scenes including the discharging of firearms causing death. There is a “quick exit” button at the top of the website if you need it, and Wellness Supports are also listed.

Some of the information within this website may be disturbing or upsetting for some visitors. This website deals with information about events that include gun and other violence, including gender-based violence and intimate partner violence. If you need to leave at any point, there is a “quick exit” button at the top of the website. This website also includes some suggested resources, should you be in need of support.

This website uses cookies
We use cookies to help improve your experience while using this website. By continuing to use this site you are agreeing to this use of cookies. Read more about cookies and other information in our Privacy Policy.